MarocMama

eat well, travel often, dream big!

Moroccan Harissa Spiked Chili for #SundaySupper

When the temperatures begin to dip the first thing people reach for are soups and stews. But, by this time of winter the novelty of those hearty, warming foods has worn off. Where is spring, already?!? Here in Morocco, winter is nothing like the upper Midwest. Our day time temperatures rarely go below 60F, and generally are in the 70’s and sunny. But nighttime temperatures drop fast to the 40’s and 50’s. Without indoor heat, it is very cold! I love making stews and welcome any chance to try something new.

This week for #SundaySupper we’re having a virtual chili cook-off! I’ve never entered a cooking competition but with the prize of a chance to attend the Food and Wine Conference in Florida this summer it’s worth it! You can see all of the chili entries at the bottom of this post, and then please head over to the Sunday Supper website and cast a vote for your favorite (*fingers crossed* it’s mine!) You can vote through the end of the day on Thursday, 2/27.

I started thinking about how I’d make a different kind of chili. I mean, what really makes a chili, chili? Some digging online told me that it needs to have chili peppers. We have a few different kinds of chilis in Morocco but the most famous is the chili paste- harissa. To me chili also has to have a tomato paste and beans. I combined all the flavors that mean chili to me and created this —

Morocca Harissa Spiked Chili #SundaySupper

Moroccan Harissa Spiked Chili for #SundaySupper

Ingredients

  • 1/2 lb ground beef
  • 1 onion
  • 1 Tbsp crushed garlic
  • 2 large, fresh tomatoes
  • 2 Tbsp tomato paste
  • 5 cups beef broth
  • 2 Tbsp cumin
  • 1/2 tsp harissa
  • 1 tsp salt
  • 2 tsp paprika
  • 1 cup red beans
  • 1/4 cup lentils
  • 1/4 cup vermicelli noodles
  • 1 egg

Instructions

  • If you are using dry beans and lentils, rinse and clean the night beforehand. Soak in water overnight to prepare for chili.
  • Begin the soup by browning 1/2 lb ground beef in the bottom of a stock pot. While the meat is cooking, thinly slice 1 onion.
  • When the meat has been cooked remove it and set aside, but leave any fat left in the pot. Add the sliced onions and cook until softened and browned. Drain any liquid left.
  • Add the meat back to the pot, along with the 5 cups of beef broth.
  • Grate the two tomatoes (or leave in chunks if you prefer chunkier chili) and add to the soup. Mix in the tomato paste, harissa, garlic, cumin, salt, and paprika.
  • Allow soup to gently simmer for 15 minutes.
  • Add lentils and red beans and cook until soft (appx 20 minutes).
  • Lastly add the vermicelli noodles, cook another 5-7 minutes until al dente.
  • Crack the egg in a bowl, whisk, and using a cup slowly stream some of the liquid from the soup into the egg to gradually heat up the egg, without cooking it. Continue doing this until you can feel the egg liquid is warmed. Then slowly stream the liquid in the bowl, back into the pot. This is the Moroccan way of thickening traditional harira soup. It's a great way to thicken and add some extra protein.
  • Serve with harissa on the side or on top to increase the heat.
3.1
http://marocmama.com/2014/02/moroccan-harissa-spiked-chili-for-sundaysupper.html

Harissa Spiked Chili for #SundaySupper

**If you’ve never tried harissa, or don’t have access to buy any you can make your own at home! It might become your new favorite hot sauce!**

What is everyone else making? Take a look!

Beef and Bison Chili

Pork Chili

Chicken, Duck, and Turkey Chili

Mixed (meat combo) Chili

Fish and Seafood Chili

Vegetarian Chili

Twist-on-Chili

Best Wines To Pair with Chili #SundaySupper from ENOFYLZ Wine Blog
Chili Cook-Off Voting at the Sunday Supper Movement Online Community Magazine

Sunday Supper Movement

Join the #SundaySupper conversation on twitter on Sunday! We tweet throughout the day and share recipes from all over the world. Our weekly chat starts at 7:00 pm ET. Follow the #SundaySupper hashtag and remember to include it in your tweets to join in the chat. Check out our #SundaySupper Pinterest board for more fabulous recipes and food photos.

Would you like to join the Sunday Supper Movement? It’s easy! You can sign up by clicking here: Sunday Supper Movement

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Cinnamony Sweet Moroccan Orange Salad

Salads in Morocco are a big deal. No matter what you will always find at least one, but usually several different small plates with salads served. Lately, I’ve been eating them simply as my meal. There’s a rice, potato, and corn salad (I know it sounds like a bad combination but it’s not!) that I gobble up with a fork, and then my favorite za’alook, a cold eggplant and tomato mashed salad eaten with pieces of warm, fresh bread. Most salads are light and made up with fresh, seasonal vegetables. I never get tired of them. A few weeks ago I got a comment on one of my posts from someone looking for a recipe for an orange salad.

I knew exactly what she was talking about and so took to my archives to find the link. But it wasn’t there and I realized I had never blogged this recipe. How could it be?!? Mandarins are in season right now, and large oranges are trickling in.  I decided to show you how to make this using the delicious, sweet little mandarins that we can’t get enough of.

Moroccan Orange Salad

Really, this couldn’t be any easier.  I peeled mandarins taking care to leave the oranges in tact.  Then I carefully peeled open each orange so that the bottom was still held together by the membrane, creating this flower appearance.  It’s just for looks, so feel free to pull all the segments apart and forego this added step.  If you’re using whole, large oranges, remove the skin but leave the orange whole.  Use a very sharp knife to cut rounds out of the orange. Now how to dress them?

  • Squeeze some orange juice over the top
  • Sprinkle with cinnamon (more or less depending on what you like)
  • Sprinkle with powdered sugar

That’s it. So simple.  So delicious.

What’s your favorite Moroccan salad? (Find my salad recipes here)

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#SundaySupper Cheddar Popcorn Soup for the #FamilyDinnerTable

Cheddar Popcorn Soup

This week is the third in a series of events that has Sunday Supper joining up with American Family Insurance to gather around the #FamilyDinnerTable.  Today’s theme centers around our favorite food group – cheese! It wasn’t until we moved to Morocco that my boys and I realized just how deep the love of cheese ran in our veins. I grew up in Wisconsin, where we’re very proud of our dairy heritage. Did you know that Wisconsin is the only place in the United States that has a Master Cheesemaker certification? The University of Wisconsin-Madison operates this program for veteran cheesemakers who have at least 10 years of experience in the field and then must complete the 3 year program. We take cheese seriously!

WI Cheese

When you see the Wisconsin Cheese seal you know you’re getting a high quality product.  There are few meals that cheese doesn’t pair with (well at least that’s my opinion!) Here are some of my tips for buying and using cheese in your meals;

  • hard cheeses can be frozen.  Varieties like cheddar, firm mozzerella, colby or pepper jack can be frozen then thawed to use.  Stock up when there’s a sale and always have it on hand.
  • Soft cheeses like goat cheese can elevate a sauce by adding creaminess and flavor.
  • Fruit and cheese mixed together can be a wonderful treat.  Try mixing in crumbly cheeses like feta, blue cheese, or halloumi in a fruit and/or vegetable salad.
  • Last minute guests? Select a hard, soft, and semi-soft cheese, crackers/bread, olives, and seasonal fruit.  Arrange on plates for an instant and easy appetizer spread.

The meal I made for this week’s #SundaySupper came from remembering a meal my mom made when I was growing up.  She called it popcorn soup, and served a big pot of soup along with a giant bowl of popcorn. It was so cool that we got to eat popcorn on our soup, that my sister and I gobbled it up. My mom later revealed to me the that while the soup tasted cheesy, she really blended in a lot of vegetables – and we never knew it! With a little big of creativity (popcorn) and a flavor we couldn’t resist (cheddar cheese) she successfully managed to fill us with vegetables.  Go Mom!

I have a feeling your family will love this recipe too.  One word of advice, let the soup cool a little bit before putting popcorn on top. If it’s too hot the popcorn will shrivel right up.

Mom's Popcorn Soup

#SundaySupper Cheddar Popcorn Soup for the #FamilyDinnerTable

Ingredients

  • 4 cups vegetable or chicken broth
  • 2 cloves crushed garlic
  • 1/2 medium onion diced
  • 2 bags of frozen mixed vegetables
  • 1 1/2 cups shredded sharp cheddar cheese
  • 2 cups 2% milk
  • 3 cups water
  • 1/2 tsp pepper
  • 1/4 tsp salt
  • 2 cloves crushed garlic
  • 1/2 medium onion diced

Instructions

  • In a large pot add 4 cups of broth and 3 cups of water. Bring to a boil.
  • Add frozen vegetables, onion, and garlic to the boiling liquid. I use California Blend (carrots, cauliflower, and broccoli) but you can use any mix of vegetables you like. Cook until tender. .
  • Season with salt and pepper, adjusting as needed.
  • In a food processor, blender, or with an immersion blender puree the soup until completely smooth.
  • Return to the heat, add 2 cups of milk and bring to the point where it just starts bubbling.
  • Mix in cheddar cheese until melted.
  • Serve in a big bowl, with plenty of popcorn to add on top.
3.1
http://marocmama.com/2013/11/sundaysupper-cheddar-popcorn-soup-for-the-familydinnertable.html

American Family Insurance has started the #FamilyDinnerTable campaign to share their the belief that the next generation of dreamers starts at the family dinner table.  American Family has also creating an e-cookbook to inspire families to come back to the table. Be on the lookout for the e-cookbook later this fall. All next week #SundaySupper contributors will be sharing submitted recipes as a part of our #WeekdaySupper series.  I’ll be posting a great recipe tomorrow for Coke Chicken and Twice Baked Potatoes. To follow the other contributions and more great family meals follow American Family’s #FamilyDinnerTable board on Pinterest.

You can follow along as we join with American Family Insurance to share family recipes and stories through FacebookPinterest. YouTube and Twitter.

Join the #SundaySupper conversation on twitter each Sunday. We tweet throughout the day and share recipes from all over the world. Our weekly chat starts at 7:00 pm EST, and this week we are sharing Sunday Suppers that feature cheese, and tips as to how you can incorporate cheese into your family meals. Follow the #SundaySupper hashtag and remember to include it in your tweets to join in the chat. Check out our #SundaySupper Pinterest board for more fabulous recipes and food photos.

Check out these other great recipes using cheese!
Cheesy Recipes Perfect for Sunday Supper:

And don’t forget, our eCookbook featuring many of our favorite recipes will be coming out just in time for the Holidays.

Join the #SundaySupper conversation on twitter on Sunday! We tweet throughout the day and share recipes from all over the world. Our weekly chat starts at 7:00 pm ET. Follow the #SundaySupper hashtag and remember to include it in your tweets to join in the chat. Check out our #SundaySupper Pinterest board for more fabulous recipes and food photos.

Would you like to join the Sunday Supper Movement? It’s easy. You can sign up by clicking here ? Sunday Supper Movement.
AmFam Back To The Family Dinnertable Logo

Disclosure: This post is sponsored by American Family Insurance. All opinions are my own.

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What happens when you leave North Africa and are dropped to the Midwest in under 24 hours? Severe temperature issues that’s what! When I left Morocco it was in the mid-80’s and I’ve been “enjoying” balmy 30 degree temperatures daily since being back.  It left me with one thing to do – make soup. Lots of soup.

Italian Wedding Soup Bowl

I had a very long flight back to the US and made sure to fill my iPad with TV shows before I left. I love the free shows, especially since I don’t get to watch much American TV in Morocco. One of the shows I downloaded was My Grandmother’s Ravioli with Mo Rocca. If you haven’t seen it the premise of the show is, Mo going to the kitchens of America’s grandma’s and making their signature dishes. The grandma in this episode was making Italian Wedding Soup (among other things) to send to her triplet grandson’s, all of which were in the Air Force.

This soup isn’t something my grandma ever made. Even though I grew up in an Italian enclave I really don’t ever remember having it. It’s pretty simple, vegetables, meat, and broth. In most recipes spinach is the green vegetable of choice but with this being fall, I went with brussel sprouts instead. I also think this makes a great way to use some of the lamb you might have in your freezer.  Saffron Road has recently come out with a lamb broth that made a great base for this recipe.  I was skeptical and afraid it would be too gamey (I often feel this way with lamb) but it’s really very subtle and delicious.

Italian Wedding Soup

Italian Wedding Soup

Ingredients

  • 1/2 medium onion
  • 1 cup chopped carrots
  • 1 tsp butter
  • 1 carton Saffron Road Lamb Broth
  • 1/4 pound ground lamb
  • 1/4 tsp salt
  • 1/4 tsp ginger
  • 1/8 tsp pepper
  • leaves of 4-5 brussel sprouts
  • orzo, rice, or another small pasta (optional)
  • asiago cheese (optional)

Instructions

  • Chop onions and carrots as fine as possible.
  • In a large pot, add 1 tsp of butter, turn heat to low and add onions. Cook 2-3 minutes.
  • Empty container of lamb broth and add carrots to the pot, and turn heat to high.
  • While the soup heats, begin preparing meatballs.
  • Mix the ground lamb with 1/4 tsp each salt and garlic and 1/8 tsp pepper.
  • Combine spices with the meat so that it's combined well. Roll small meatballs with your hands. The smaller the better.
  • Add meatballs and any pasta to the broth as soon as it begins to boil.
  • Reduce heat to medium and continue cooking until the meatballs are cooked through.
  • In the final 10 minutes before serving, add the brussel sprout leaves and allow a few minutes for them to soften.
  • Serve hot, grate asiago cheese on top for an added treat.
  • *Traditionally this is made with small pasta, however being gluten-free I tend to omit it. This is totally up to you!
3.1
http://marocmama.com/2013/10/italian-wedding-soup.html
Disclosure: I am a paid brand ambassador for Saffron Road Food.  I do receive compensation and product in exchange for developing recipes. All opinions are my own.
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Moroccan Carrot, Chickpea, Dried Fruit and Almond Salad from Paula of Vintage Kitchen Notes

I’m so happy to welcome Paula of Vintage Kitchen Notes as a guest blogger today.  Paula is one of the uber-talented bloggers I’ve gotten to know through #SundaySupper and a fellow international blogger. Her pictures alone make me want to climb through the screen and into her kitchen. Also, she’s located in Argentina, one of the South American destinations I’m dying to visit, so I guess crawling through the screen might not be such a bad idea? To find more of her great recipes you can connect with Paula on her blog, Facebook, Twitter, and Pinterest.  

Hello from the southern part of the world! I blog from Buenos Aires, the city where I live.

Being here today is exciting because the idea of learning more about different cuisines is very motivating. Moroccan always rings a good bell in my mind, and after meeting Amanda through Sunday Supper and snooping around her recipes, I realized that the mix of dried fruit, the tagines, preserved lemons and spices like cumin are what makes me love this type of food. Titles like lamb and eggplant tajinezaatar flat bread and sesame honey cookies make me swoon, and just shows what a talented cook this girl is.

I like to explore different food cultures. What foodie doesn’t right? In my case my heritage is a lot of Italian and regional, so growing up there were a lot of empanadasgrilled meats with chimichurri and dulce de leche

When Amanda asked for guest posts, specifying that she needed Moroccan dishes, I jumped at the opportunity. Spices and dried fruits are my middle name, and this carrot, chickpea and dried fruit salad fit the bill perfectly.

CARROT CHICKPEA SALAD

It´s the middle of winter here, but most of you who read this blog are under scorching temps, so a salad with pungent flavors was the perfect recipe for today. And anyway, the years have brought us milder winters, making salads a common appearance year round, not just during the warmer seasons. Salad is good for you, and this one is packed with healthy ingredients, it´s nutritious and colorful, the perfect lunch really.

Ever since I made this zucchini mint salad, ribbons are my favorite way to cut some vegetables when I use them raw in salads. Carrots are one of them, and they are not only visually attractive, but they give volume to the plate and I love that. Food is, after all, very visual. Not just for a blog picture, but in real life.

Most salads in general are very easy to adjust to personal taste. My choice here is a marked spice flavor, especially cumin which I love when it´s toasted and ground with a mortar and pestle. And then sliced, toasted almonds clearly change the final result. That crunch and nutty flavor goes extraordinarily well with the dried fruit and vegetables.

CARROT CHICKPEA SALAD 022

Back when I was a kid, chickpeas didn´t come in a can, at least not in this country. They were soaked overnight in cold water and boiled the next day until tender. I like to do it once in a while now, but nothing beats opening a can of already cooked chickpeas for a quick bite.

As it usually happens, I made the salad, took the pictures, ate half for lunch and the rest went into the fridge. It turns out that I particularly like the way the dressing macerates and softens the carrots when left to chill for a few hours. So this is a salad that can be prepared a few hours before. But add the chopped herbs and almonds at the last minute.

CARROT CHICKPEA SALAD

MOROCCAN CARROT, CHICKPEA, DRIED FRUIT AND ALMOND SALAD

barely adapted from 101Cookbooks

Makes 4 servings

Ingredients

For the dressing:

  • 1 teaspoon cumin seeds
  • 1 teaspoon coriander seeds
  • 1/3 cup olive oil
  • 2-3 Tbs fresh lemon juice
  • ½ teaspoon salt, or to taste

For the salad:

  • 2 large carrots
  • 2 cups cooked chickpeas, drained and rinsed if they´re from a can
  • 6 dried apricot halves, sliced
  • 4 black dried figs, sliced
  • ¼ to 1/3 cup sliced, toasted almonds
  • Fresh mint and dill, coarsely torn or left whole

Directions

For the dressing:

In a skillet, heat seeds over low heat for 1 or 2 minutes, until fragrant. Transfer to a mortar or grinder and coarsely grind.

In a jar mix the rest of the dressing ingredients and add the ground seeds. Reserve in the fridge while making the salad.

For the salad:

Peel carrots, and with the vegetable peeler, make long ribbons, letting them fall onto the serving plate. Add chickpeas, a few tablespoons of the dressing and mix lightly with your hands, mounding a bit.

Scatter the dried fruits and herbs on top, drizzle more dressing, add toasted almonds and serve.

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Vegetarian Moroccan Harira

For Moroccans, harira soup is a Ramadan ritual.  Every evening families sit down to bowls of steaming harira – even when daytime summer temperatures soar about the 100F mark. I love soup, but the last thing I want to do is leave my stove on for hours during the hottest part of summer. Instead, I created this quicker version to satisfy the Ramadan ritual but keep my house at a tolerable temperature.

Bowl of Vegetarian Harira

Traditional harira is made with dried lentils, dry chickpeas, rice, vermicelli noodles, a potpurri of herbs and spices, vegetables, and meat – most often lamb. If you’ve ever cooked with dry chickpeas you’ll know this part of the cooking process can take hours, just to soften the beans. I really prefer this soup without meat (but that’s kind of every food lately!), and omitting meat automatically cuts off cooking time.  My next shortcut is to use a pre-made broth.

Vegetarian Harira

I rarely ever reach for a vegetable broth when cooking, mostly because I’ve never found one that tastes good. Often I find them bland, with the only flavor of salt coming through. I really love Saffron Road’s Vegetable Broth because it’s the opposite of every other brand I’ve tasted. If I were taking the traditional route for this soup, I would chop up a bunch of vegetables to create a broth, but really there’s no need when using this broth.  It has all the flavor I was looking for.  More time saved!

Quick Harira Soup

I wasn’t sure how this short-cut soup was going to be received but surprisingly MarocBaba actually preferred this version to others that I have made. I know that this is one recipe I’ll be holding onto for a long time to come.  When the temperatures drop I’ll be wanting a big giant bowl of this harira to warm me up.

**Great News!  Saffron Road products will be on sale at Whole Foods August 6-8th. Also, if you’re a fan of their frozen entrees the are increasing distribution!  They are now selling family sized Lamb Saag at Costco in AZ, NM, CO, UT, NV & CA. Also, starting around August 9th they will be selling family sized Chicken Tikka Masala at Costco in ME, VT, NH, CT, NY, NJ, PA (some), MD, DE, VA. You can always check out the store locator on their website to find a store near you.

Vegetarian Moroccan Harira

Ingredients

  • 1 medium to large onion
  • 3-4 cloves garlic
  • 3-4 tomatoes as fresh as possible
  • 1 handful chopped Italian parsley
  • 1/2 handful chopped cilantro
  • 1 small can tomato paste
  • 2 Tbsp Olive oil
  • 1/2 tsp salt
  • 1½ tsp Black Pepper
  • 1Tbsp Paprika
  • 1 Tbsp Turmeric
  • 1 small pinch Saffron crushed (if desired)
  • ½ c canned organic garbanzo beans
  • ¼ c lentils (rinsed)
  • 1/4 c rice (I use long grain or basmati)
  • 3 cups water
  • 1 carton Saffron Road Vegetable Broth
  • Food Processor

Instructions

  • Heat olive oil in large stockpot on the stovetop.
  • Finely chop onion and garlic, and saute in the stockpot.
  • Wash and core tomatoes and then puree in a food processor along with parsley and cilantro.
  • Add tomato and herb puree along with salt, pepper, paprika, turmeric (and saffron if desired) to the pot.
  • Next, add water, tomato paste and 1 carton of Vegetable Broth to the mix.
  • Bring the soup to a boil and add lentils, rice, and garbanzo beans and reduce heat to medium. Cover.
  • Once the lentils and rice are tender (will vary but about 20 minutes) turn down the heat.
  • You can thicken the soup by adding a flour roux or leave as is.
  • The harira should be thick but still have a soup consistency.
3.1
http://marocmama.com/2013/08/vegetarian-moroccan-harira.html

This soup took about 1 hour start to finish to make.  Traditional harira takes several more. You might not be making this every night, but by making one big pot you’ll be guaranteed leftovers.  To preserve, transfer soup to smaller sized, freezer safe containers and allow to cool completely. Cover the containers, and pop into the freezer.  When you want to use it again, transfer to your refrigerator until the soup can be removed from the container.  You could also submerge it part way in warm water.  Heat through in a pan on the stove top.

Disclaimer: I am a brand ambassador for Saffron Road Food.  I do receive compensation for recipe creation as well as product to use. My opinions and creations are my own. 

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Strawberry Balsamic Quinoa Salad on #TheSaladBar

Our summer is full of picnics, BBQ’s, and this year iftars. We have spent many of our days on the run and having fun! Last month I participated in #TheSaladBar, a group of bloggers who share their salad recipes each month. This month’s theme was potluck salads.

Strawberry Balsamic Quinoa Salad

Potluck salads where I grew up were either a) pasta salad b) cold bean salad c) jello “salad”.   (If someone can explain to me why it’s called a jello salad I would really appreciate it).  I totally drew a blank when I tried to think of a potluck salad to share…so I made one up! Strawberries just came in season here last week.  We had snow until mid-May (yuck) and it didn’t get much warmer until June. I had gotten some from the farmer’s market but was sad to find they weren’t very sweet so time for plan B – strawberry dressing!

Strawberry Balsamic Dressing

I just cleaned and removed the tops of 2 cups of strawberries and sent them through my food processor, and then the most important step – straining.  My least favorite part of strawberries are the little seeds that inevitably get stuck in my teeth only to be discovered after they’ve wedged their way into my gums.  Ugh hate that! Technically you don’t have to strain the strawberry puree but I think you should.

Strawberry Balsamic Dressing

It couldn’t be much easier, just whisk in some balsamic vinegar, I added about 3 TBSP and tasted it.  If you like vinegar, add some more.  If you like just a little, well then stop right there.  You can add a little drizzle of olive oil too – I think it helps make a thinner consistency for the dressing.  I have to admit I would have eaten this dressing with a spoon.  Ok, I did eat this dressing with a spoon, but just a little. I might have mopped some of it up with bread too. And drizzled it on some cheese….

Strawberry Salad

But, back to the salad.  You know those mason jar salads that are (or were) all the rage on Pinterest?  I took my inspiration from that, and my Desserts in Jars experience. I think this is a perfect potluck salad because it’s portable, easy to eat, and already portioned.  Also you can chill the jars on ice in a big bowl – how cute would that be? All I know is they were really good, they held up over the course of several days without turning mushy.  One small problem is these are little jars and so it was a little tough to mix the salad.  You could instead either use a bigger jar or pour the salad out onto a plate before eating it.

Quinoa Strawberry Salad in Jars

Strawberry Balsamic Quinoa Salad on #TheSaladBar

Ingredients

    Strawberry Balsamic Dressing
  • 2 cups topped and hulled strawberries
  • 3 Tbsp+ balsamic dressing
  • olive oil
  • 1-2 tsp honey (as needed)
  • Salad
  • Cooked Quinoa
  • Strawberries
  • Pistachios
  • Pea Pods
  • Feta Cheese
  • Mason Jars - size you like!

Instructions

    Strawberry Balsamic Dressing
  • Clean strawberries, by rinsing, removing tops and cores. Place in a blender or food processor and pulse until a liquid.
  • Strain strawberry juice to remove the seeds.
  • Whisk in balsamic vinegar, adjusting to your taste.
  • Add olive oil to thin out the dressing.
  • If your strawberries are not very sweet, you can also whisk in 1-2 tsp of honey to sweeten it just a bit.
  • Salad Assembly
  • In the bottom of the mason jar, first add some of the salad dressing. For a 1 cup mason jar, I added 3 tsp of salad dressing.
  • Next add the pistachios.
  • Followed by the pea pods.
  • The next layer should be the cooked quinoa.
  • Finally add the feta cheese and strawberries to the top.
  • Seal the jar and serve!
3.1
http://marocmama.com/2013/07/strawberry-balsamic-quinoa-salad-on-thesaladbar.html

Check out these other potluck salad recipes from some great bloggers!

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Easy Chicken and Dumplings

Soup is a hard sell in our house. But thick, creamy stews, well they get eaten up right away.  Chicken and dumplings is not a meal I grew up with but my sister first made for us about a year ago.  I love it, my kids love it, even MarocBaba loves it.

Easy Chicken and Dumplings

Summer in the Midwest is humid and oppressive at times.  We wait months and months (sometimes 8 or more!) for the sun to finally break through and warm things up. Some nights the humidity lingers making your clothes stick to your back and your tongue thick in your mouth.  Then there are the nights when the cool air begins to blow, whispering a reminder that this time is short lived – soon winter will be back.  I love the cool nights, when a light sweater is in order and it’s enjoyable to take a walk around the neighborhood.  It’s those nights that I don’t mind starting the stove, knowing full well it will add heat to the house.

Chicken and Dumplings Ingredients

Summer brings those of us in the Midwest, fresh, delicious produce; most of it grown locally on family farms.  These few short months I try to eat as many fruits and vegetables as I can because I know by September it will all be gone. That’s what I use in all of my recipes and it makes everything taste just that much better.

Chicken and Dumplings is one of those cool summer night dishes. Warm enough to take off the chill but loaded with fresh produce.  Don’t be fooled into thinking this is a meal that requires a long cooking time or a ton of kitchen skills.  It’s soooo easy! I’ve changed the recipe some so that this can be made in about 30 minutes. You can use leftovers that you have on hand.  I’ve made this recipe gluten- free, but you don’t have to.

Chicken and Dumplings-

Easy Chicken and Dumplings

Ingredients

    For the Stew
  • 1 Tbsp butter
  • 1 Tbsp olive oil
  • 1 carton Saffron Road Chicken Broth
  • 2 cups of diced, cooked chicken
  • 3-4 carrots diced
  • 1 medium onion diced
  • 1/2 cup peas
  • 1 tsp salt
  • 1/2 tsp pepper
  • 3-4 springs of thyme, leaves removed from stalk
  • For the Dumplings
  • 1/2 tsp baking powder
  • 1/4 tsp salt
  • 3/4 cup gluten-free all-purpose flour
  • 1/2 cup milk
  • 2 tbsp butter

Instructions

  • In a large pan, add the olive oil and butter and turn heat to medium high.
  • Once the butter has melted, stir in the diced onion and diced carrot. Cook 5-8 minutes, continuing to stir, until the onion is translucent.
  • Pour in all of the chicken broth, as well as the salt, pepper, thyme leaves, and chopped chicken.(Chicken could be leftover from a roast/rotisserie chicken, or boiled ahead of time - you can use raw chicken it will just take longer to cook.)
  • Cook for 15 minutes on low heat for flavors to combine.
  • Making the Dumplings
  • Stir together baking powder, salt, and flour.
  • Cut the butter into the flour, either using a food processor, pastry cutter, or your hands.
  • Slowly add the milk until a dough has been formed.
  • Finishing the Meal
  • You can either roll out the dough and cut into flat noodle shapes, or drop into the pan like a drop dumpling. Adjust the milk according to your preference. Drop dumplings will have a more liquidy batter, whereas rolled dumplings should be more firm.
  • Once added to the liquid, cover and cook on low for 10-12 minutes until dumplings are cooked through. The flour from the dumplings will help thicken the soup.
  • Serve hot.
3.1
http://marocmama.com/2013/06/easy-chicken-and-dumplings.html
Disclaimer: I am a paid brand ambassador for Saffron Road Foods.  All recipes and opinions created with Saffron Road are my own. 
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