Posts Tagged‘ramadan’

Eat Your Veggies!

If you’re fasting this month are you making sure to eat enough fruits and vegetables?  Last month American Muslim Mom posted a story that many Muslims actually GAIN weight during Ramadan.  How can that be?  For many after a day of fasting the foods that fill the table are fried or sugar laden.  The recipes that I have selected to share this month in meal planning I have attempted to balance so that they are not only the treats that many associate with Ramadan. Make sure your suhoor and iftar table are full of fresh fruits and veggies! Suhoor –…

Avgolemono and Veal Meatball Soup

For as long as I can remember the only thing on my bucket list (the list of things to do before you die) was to have a passport full of stamps.  That technically means there’s more than one thing on the list because gathering all those stamps would involve a few trips.  I got my first stamp at 15.  I can remember when my passport came in the mail, and this just goes to show how big of a dork I am, I must have opened it and gone through the pages 20 times.  When I went through passport control…

The Ramadan Table..A Little Early {Harira}

Whew!! I have spent a better part of the weekend working on a little blog makeover.  So…what do you think?  (PS if you say you hate it I will ignore you…just kidding!)  I think my eyes are crossed but I am happy with how things look, although I’m sure to make tweeks as I go.  But seriously I do want to know what you think! Now that I’m all set up it’s time to get back to posting.  The weather here is still dismal at best and I’ve found myself continuing to make the staples of warm winter comfort food…

Cheese Briouats

It would be highly unlikely to find this recipe on a table in Morocco.  It’s origins are in the Middle East, mostly Turkey or Greece where there is plenty of cheese consumed!   This is a fast and easy appetizer or great accompaniment to a big bowl of soup.  As the weather here turns cooler I am looking forward to lots of soups. Ingredients 1 package of filo dough (I love this one).  8 oz Greek Feta 8 oz shredded mozzerella 2 eggs beaten 1 tsp crushed garlic 1/2 tsp pepper melted butter to brush between layers 1 egg yolk beaten…

Chebekia

A staple in Morocco for Ramadan is the chebekia a flavored cookie that is fried and then soaked in honey and sprinkled with sesame seeds.  I love these cookies but they are a little difficult to make.  I attempted to extract the exact recipe from my mother in law but they don’t measure anything and they also make these in HUGE batches – and by huge I mean about 10-15kg at a time.  Because they are so time consuming many families will get together to split the work and then share the bounty.   I’m going to use Christine’s recipe to…

Light and Easy Kefta Meatballs

I usually prepare a big iftar meal for my husband during Ramadan.  We would eat plenty of haraira, briouats and other tasty traditional Moroccan dishes.  This year I’m alone and going through all that trouble just doesn’t make a lot of sense.  Instead I’m opting for light and healthy meals.  This was one of those meals.  Basic.  Kefta meatballs in tomato sauce, diced mangos, avocados, a cucumber and yellow tomatoes.  No dressing, just healthy, yummy summer goodness.  The meatballs were especially good.  They weren’t as heavy as most meatballs and I add some cayenne pepper for an extra zing. Kefta…

Ramadan and Food

Today is the first day of Ramadan in North America.  Not sure what that means?  Here is a good explanation.  The short of it however is that Ramadan is the 9th lunar month on the Islamic calendar and entails fasting from worldly pleasures (food, drink, intimacy…) from sun up until sun down for the entire month.  It is a time to focus on faith, God and in a way purification of the soul.  So while no food or drink is allowed during the day; once the sun goes down all prohibitions are listed.  The morning meal is known as suhoor,…

Cookies! Almond “Zeligge” Truffles

I read a lot of food blogs and subscribe to plenty of recipe “sending” newsletters.  It’s pretty hard to escape the inundation of sweet, sugary, chocolate covered goodness that is abundant this time of year.  I know many Muslims do not celebrate Christmas, however my family is not one of them.  Without getting too religious and/or political let’s just say we are secular Christmas “celebraters.”  I’m sure I’ll get criticism both ways for that comment but here’s our thinking.  We love our family and my family happens to be 100% Christian.  I grew up with Christmas as a major factor…