I’ve been gone from #SundaySupper for a few weeks but am excited to jump back into the shuffle!  It’s that time of year when there are many (many!) get togethers and events to host and attend.  Maybe you’re hosting and maybe you’ve just been asked to bring along something to nibble.  This week’s posts are all about entertaining and are a mix of drinks and appetizers.  I can’t believe I haven’t posted a recipe for how to make Moroccan mint tea but realized now would be a great time.  This is a great drink for adults and kids.  Even people who don’t like tea love Moroccan tea! Please note, I don’t post alcoholic recipes here because we don’t drink, several of the drinks shared by other bloggers do contain alcohol so skip over if you don’t imbibe but by all means check them out if you’re interested!

Moroccan Mint Tea

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Moroccan tea doesn’t come in a tea bag.  It’s brewed loose and you will get pieces of tea leaves and mint in your cup.  Don’t worry it settles to the bottom and it’s customary to always leave just a little bit of sediment there.  To make the tea you will need;

  • loose green tea.  Chinese Gunpowder tea is the most commonly used variety.
  • Mint.  Fresh mint is the best but if it’s not in season or expensive dried mint also works
  • Sugar.
  • Water (of course)

I use a metal teapot, like is shown above but a ceramic pot also works. This recipe is based on a 16oz capacity teapot. Place your tea kettle on to boil. Then add 2 heaping teaspoons of loose tea to your teapot.  If you’re using fresh mint add 5-6 springs into the pot – you may need to stuff it in!  Finally add 4-5 teaspoons of sugar.  Is this a lot of sugar? Yes.  But the sugar is key.  If you served a Moroccan tea with out sugar they probably would be too polite to say anything but would wonder what in the world was going on.  On an interesting note the level of sweetness varies regionally.  The further south in the country you go the sweeter the tea gets.  I have a friend from northern Morocco who makes tea one way but always doubles the sugar when my husband is at the table.  When your water has boiled pour it into the teapot.

If you are using a metal teapot, place it onto your burner and turn up the heat.  You will want the water to boil again as a way to steep the tea. If you are using a ceramic tea pot, allow the tea to steep for about 5 minutes before serving.  Tea is served in small glass cups.  It’s a skill to pour the correct way which is holding the tea pot with one handed and raising the stream as high as possible.  This action creates bubbles on the top of the tea cup – the more bubbles the better. It’s common to see the host pour a glass of tea and then pour it back into the tea pot.  This may happen several times.  It’s a way to circulate the tea before serving.  This may seem like a complicated way to prepare tea but the results are well worth it!

Make sure to join some of the other bloggers who are sharing their recipes this week as well!

Holiday Cocktails

Holiday Appetizers or Hors d’oeuvres

In honor of the Sandy Hook victims and their families, we have cancelled our regularly scheduled #SundaySupper Chat this week.