MarocBaba and I always come to a head when I start “playing” with a tajine.  To him there’s no messing with an original.  When I started to put this tajine together he thought it was another attempt on my part to make something new. But, I first saw this tajine in Paula Wolfert’s Food of Morocco.  The original calls for cut up quinces. I’ve never seen a quince in our markets and am sure they simply are not in demand here.  I did however have some quince paste from another recipe I had made.  The quince paste really worked beautifully.

I prepared this tajine in an unglazed clay tajine and think that it truly made the flavor that much deeper.  I’m not saying you couldn’t try this in a glazed tajine or even in a heavy pot but I just don’t think it will taste the same.  Be sure to cook this over low heat and watch a little more closely than other tajines.  The quince paste can dry up quickly.

Chicken and Walnut Tajine

Ingredients

  • 1 lb of chicken pieces
  • 1 medium onion finely chopped
  • 1 Tbsp crushed garlic
  • 2 tsp ginger
  • 1 tsp salt
  • 1 tsp pepper
  • 2 Tbsp vegetable oil
  • 1 tsp cinnamon
  • pinch of crumbled saffron threads
  • small handful chopped parsley
  • 2 Tbsp butter cubed
  • 1/4 c water
  • 3 tsp quince paste
  • 1/2 cup walnuts

Instructions

  • In the bottom of an unglazed clay tajine add the vegetable oil and turn heat to medium.
  • Finely chop the onion and crush 2 teaspoons of garlic (2-3 cloves). Add these to the tajine.
  • In a bowl mix together the salt, pepper, ginger, cinnamon, saffron threads, parsley and quince paste with enough water to create a paste.
  • Rinse the chicken and place in the spice paste, taking care that the chicken is coated.
  • Add the chicken pieces to the tajine along with any remaining marinade.
  • Pour in 1/4 cup of water and 2 tablespoons of cubed butter.
  • Cover the tajine and reduce heat to medium-low.
  • Allow to cook for 1 1/2 - 2 hours. Check at the 1 hour, 1.5 hour and 2 hour mark and add a little more water if necessary.
  • The tajine is ready when the chicken is tender to the touch. There should still be liquid in the tajine.
  • Toasting Walnuts
  • In a skillet, add the walnuts and turn heat to medium-high.
  • When the walnuts begin to toast you will be able to smell the oils being released.
  • Stir the walnuts to make sure they don't burn.
  • Remove from the heat as soon as the walnuts begin to brown.
  • Top the tajine with toasted walnuts and serve immediately. This dish is traditionally eaten with crusty bread but could also be served on top of rice, barley or couscous.
http://marocmama.com/2012/11/chicken-quince-and-walnut-tajine.html

 

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